April142014
earthstory:

Lunar EclipseOn the night of April 14/15, Monday going into Tuesday, there will be a total eclipse of the Moon visible from a large area on Earth.This graphic shows where the best viewing will be; far western Europe will get a glimpse of the eclipse as it starts closet to 6:00 UTC, but North and South America will largely get the full show.6:00 UTC is 2:00 a.m. Eastern Daylight time, so this eclipse will happen in the dead of night, but could well be an excuse to get up (if it isn’t supposed to rain for you, as it is for me. Sigh). The full extent of the eclipse should be around 3:00 to 4:30 a.m.The Earth casts a shadow in two parts; the penumbra, a hazy outer-shadow and the umbra, a darker inner shadow. The two sections occur as a consequence of the geometry – since the sun isn’t a single point of light but instead has a diameter to it, there is an inner focused area to the shadow and an outer area where some light paths are clear but others are blocked.There are actually several spacecraft orbiting the moon right now, including the LADEE mission and the LRO mission which has an incredible set of cameras on it, so it’s plausible we might get a nice view of this lunar eclipse taken from the Moon if the orbits work right.This will be the first of 4 lunar eclipses within the next 2 years, so if you don’t get good weather for this one, keep an eye out for the next one this fall.-JBBFull details:http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OHfigures/OH2014-Fig01.pdf

earthstory:

Lunar Eclipse
On the night of April 14/15, Monday going into Tuesday, there will be a total eclipse of the Moon visible from a large area on Earth.

This graphic shows where the best viewing will be; far western Europe will get a glimpse of the eclipse as it starts closet to 6:00 UTC, but North and South America will largely get the full show.
6:00 UTC is 2:00 a.m. Eastern Daylight time, so this eclipse will happen in the dead of night, but could well be an excuse to get up (if it isn’t supposed to rain for you, as it is for me. Sigh). The full extent of the eclipse should be around 3:00 to 4:30 a.m.

The Earth casts a shadow in two parts; the penumbra, a hazy outer-shadow and the umbra, a darker inner shadow. The two sections occur as a consequence of the geometry – since the sun isn’t a single point of light but instead has a diameter to it, there is an inner focused area to the shadow and an outer area where some light paths are clear but others are blocked.

There are actually several spacecraft orbiting the moon right now, including the LADEE mission and the LRO mission which has an incredible set of cameras on it, so it’s plausible we might get a nice view of this lunar eclipse taken from the Moon if the orbits work right.

This will be the first of 4 lunar eclipses within the next 2 years, so if you don’t get good weather for this one, keep an eye out for the next one this fall.

-JBB

Full details:
http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/OH/OHfigures/OH2014-Fig01.pdf

11AM
laboratoryequipment:

Fish from Acidic Waters Less Able to SmellFish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor are less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that the behavior of reef fishes can be seriously affected by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fish-acidic-waters-less-able-smell

laboratoryequipment:

Fish from Acidic Waters Less Able to Smell

Fish living on coral reefs where carbon dioxide seeps from the ocean floor are less able to detect predator odor than fish from normal coral reefs, according to a new study.

The study confirms laboratory experiments showing that the behavior of reef fishes can be seriously affected by increased carbon dioxide concentrations in the ocean. The new study is the first to analyze the sensory impairment of fish from CO2 seeps, where pH is similar to what climate models forecast for surface waters by the turn of the century.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/fish-acidic-waters-less-able-smell

April92014

(Source: theweatherlab)

April82014
mothernaturenetwork:

6 important elements you’ve never heard ofFrom preventing counterfeiting to lacrosse sticks to electric motors, these elements have improved modern life with you knowing about them.

mothernaturenetwork:

6 important elements you’ve never heard of
From preventing counterfeiting to lacrosse sticks to electric motors, these elements have improved modern life with you knowing about them.

April32014
dendroica:

Pesky ticks bring Lyme disease risk to all of NJ

April showers and May flowers may be especially welcome this spring because of the harsh winter just past. But this is also the time of year when anyone visiting or living in New Jersey should be on the lookout for another, less pleasurable harbinger of the season — the blacklegged, or deer, tick.
Hardy little parasites whose bite can transmit the bacterial infection that causes Lyme disease, as well as some other bacterial and viral infections, deer ticks are present year-round. But as temperatures rise in the spring and summer, the ticks become more active and go in search of new hosts on which to feed. These include deer, small rodents, birds, dogs and, of course, humans.
A human who contracts Lyme disease can find the results unpleasant, especially if the disease is left untreated. Over time, it can affect every area of the body….
While there are other tick-borne illnesses — including the extremely rare Powassan virus that killed a Warren County woman last year — Lyme disease is the most frequently reported one in the United States. It is found almost exclusively in the Northeast and upper Midwest. In 2012, the last year for which data is available, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that New Jersey ranked third in the country, after Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, with more than 2,700 new cases of Lyme disease.
Shereen Semple, an epidemiologist with the state Department of Health, said that although Lyme disease is most prevalent in the northwestern counties of Hunterdon, Warren, Sussex and Morris, it is endemic throughout the state.
“Anyone can get Lyme disease, and all ages are at risk,” said Semple. “Males of all ages tend to have the highest number of cases, but the risk is present for everyone.”

(via NJ.com)

dendroica:

Pesky ticks bring Lyme disease risk to all of NJ

April showers and May flowers may be especially welcome this spring because of the harsh winter just past. But this is also the time of year when anyone visiting or living in New Jersey should be on the lookout for another, less pleasurable harbinger of the season — the blacklegged, or deer, tick.

Hardy little parasites whose bite can transmit the bacterial infection that causes Lyme disease, as well as some other bacterial and viral infections, deer ticks are present year-round. But as temperatures rise in the spring and summer, the ticks become more active and go in search of new hosts on which to feed. These include deer, small rodents, birds, dogs and, of course, humans.

A human who contracts Lyme disease can find the results unpleasant, especially if the disease is left untreated. Over time, it can affect every area of the body….

While there are other tick-borne illnesses — including the extremely rare Powassan virus that killed a Warren County woman last year — Lyme disease is the most frequently reported one in the United States. It is found almost exclusively in the Northeast and upper Midwest. In 2012, the last year for which data is available, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that New Jersey ranked third in the country, after Pennsylvania and Massachusetts, with more than 2,700 new cases of Lyme disease.

Shereen Semple, an epidemiologist with the state Department of Health, said that although Lyme disease is most prevalent in the northwestern counties of Hunterdon, Warren, Sussex and Morris, it is endemic throughout the state.

“Anyone can get Lyme disease, and all ages are at risk,” said Semple. “Males of all ages tend to have the highest number of cases, but the risk is present for everyone.”

(via NJ.com)

10AM
theanimalblog:

Prairie dog at Parc Animalier des Pyrénées, France. Photo by bsnadventures.

theanimalblog:

Prairie dog at Parc Animalier des Pyrénées, France. Photo by bsnadventures.

March302014
startalkradio:


Mars-Bound Comet Siding Spring Sprouts Multiple Jets

Comet Siding Spring, on its way to a close brush with Mars on October 19, has been kicking up a storm lately. New images from Hubble Space Telescope taken on March 11, when the comet was just this side of Jupiter, reveal multiple jets of gas and dust.  (source) 

startalkradio:

Mars-Bound Comet Siding Spring Sprouts Multiple Jets

Comet Siding Spring, on its way to a close brush with Mars on October 19, has been kicking up a storm lately. New images from Hubble Space Telescope taken on March 11, when the comet was just this side of Jupiter, reveal multiple jets of gas and dust.  (source

(via scinerds)

March222014
March202014
sinobug:

Common Map Butterfly Caterpillar (Cyrestis thyodamas, Nymphalidae)  The curious mind must ask, why is this caterpillar like this? My observational response is that these larvae feed on the new leaves of Ficus trees. Developing shoots appear as tightly swirled red tips at the ends of branches and these caterpillars line themselves up along the axis of open leaves, heads closest to the origin of the leaf, with their spines imitating the fresh foliage that is developing.   by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr. Pu’er, Yunnan, China  See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

sinobug:

Common Map Butterfly Caterpillar (Cyrestis thyodamas, Nymphalidae)

The curious mind must ask, why is this caterpillar like this?

My observational response is that these larvae feed on the new leaves of Ficus trees. Developing shoots appear as tightly swirled red tips at the ends of branches and these caterpillars line themselves up along the axis of open leaves, heads closest to the origin of the leaf, with their spines imitating the fresh foliage that is developing.

Common Map Butterfly Caterpillar (Cyrestis thyodamas, Nymphalidae)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese caterpillars on my Flickr site HERE…..

9AM

mothernaturenetwork:

Photographer begins epic journey to photograph our nation’s struggling bees
Photographer Clay Bolt is rolling out a huge project, traveling across the United States documenting the state of the nation’s bees, including the species responsible for pollinating our most popular crops.

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