October92014
markscherz:

Uroplatus fimbriatus
Photo by RichardJames1990.

markscherz:

Uroplatus fimbriatus

Photo by RichardJames1990.

October52014
The earliest monarch butterflies arose in North America and were migratory, contrary to what scientists believed. Over time, the butterflies evolved populations in other locations, some of which stay put year-round, scientists conclude October 1 in Nature. 

Because many of the monarch’s closest butterfly relatives live in the tropics and do not migrate, “the thought was that the butterflies [came] from South and Central America and became migratory from resident populations,” says Tyler Flockhart, a conservation biologist who concentrates on monarchs at the University of Guelph in Canada. “But that doesn’t seem to be the case.” (via Monarch butterflies’ ancestors migrated | Science News)

The earliest monarch butterflies arose in North America and were migratory, contrary to what scientists believed. Over time, the butterflies evolved populations in other locations, some of which stay put year-round, scientists conclude October 1 in Nature.

Because many of the monarch’s closest butterfly relatives live in the tropics and do not migrate, “the thought was that the butterflies [came] from South and Central America and became migratory from resident populations,” says Tyler Flockhart, a conservation biologist who concentrates on monarchs at the University of Guelph in Canada. “But that doesn’t seem to be the case.” (via Monarch butterflies’ ancestors migrated | Science News)

10AM

scienceyoucanlove:

Portuguese Man-of-War

Anyone unfamiliar with the biology of the venomous Portuguese man-of-war would likely mistake it for a jellyfish. Not only is it not a jellyfish, it’s not even an “it,” but a “they.” The Portuguese man-of-war is a siphonophore, an animal made up of a colony of organisms working together.

The man-of-war comprises four separate polyps. It gets its name from the uppermost polyp, a gas-filled bladder, or pneumatophore, which sits above the water and somewhat resembles an old warship at full sail. Man-of-wars are also known as bluebottles for the purple-blue color of their pneumatophores.

The tentacles are the man-of-war’s second organism. These long, thin tendrils can extend 165 feet (50 meters) in length below the surface, although 30 feet (10 meters) is more the average. They are covered in venom-filled nematocysts used to paralyze and kill fish and other small creatures. For humans, a man-of-war sting is excruciatingly painful, but rarely deadly. But beware—even dead man-of-wars washed up on shore can deliver a sting.

Muscles in the tentacles draw prey up to a polyp containing the gastrozooids or digestive organisms. A fourth polyp contains the reproductive organisms.

Man-of-wars are found, sometimes in groups of 1,000 or more, floating in warm waters throughout the world’s oceans. They have no independent means of propulsion and either drift on the currents or catch the wind with their pneumatophores. To avoid threats on the surface, they can deflate their air bags and briefly submerge.

source

first photo from wiki commons, second photo source

(via thescienceblog)

August82014
buggirl:

Remarkable looking Longhorn Beetle.
Yasuni, Ecuador
Like my posts?

buggirl:

Remarkable looking Longhorn Beetle.

Yasuni, Ecuador

Like my posts?

August42014
buggirl:

Some well fed type of beetle larva- maybe a type of leaf beetle.
Tiputini, Ecuador
my research

buggirl:

Some well fed type of beetle larva- maybe a type of leaf beetle.

Tiputini, Ecuador

my research

July282014
oldsampeabody:

Virginia Ctenucha (Ctenucha virginica) at Bartholomew’s Cobble, Ashley Falls, MA

oldsampeabody:

Virginia Ctenucha (Ctenucha virginica) at Bartholomew’s Cobble, Ashley Falls, MA

July142014
"The ecological niche concept is very important in ecology. But what a niche looks like is fairly abstract. Now, for the first time, researchers have concretely visualized the ecological niche. The biologists have been able to determine the position of fourteen fish species in relationship to their food in a four-dimensional food diagram."


 (via Ecologists make first image of food niche — ScienceDaily)

"The ecological niche concept is very important in ecology. But what a niche looks like is fairly abstract. Now, for the first time, researchers have concretely visualized the ecological niche. The biologists have been able to determine the position of fourteen fish species in relationship to their food in a four-dimensional food diagram."


(via Ecologists make first image of food niche — ScienceDaily)

July132014
Pelagornis sandersi - largest airborne bird with a wingspan of over six meters; probably soared, but might not have been able to sustain flapping flight. 



(via Fossils reveal largest airborne bird | Science News)

Pelagornis sandersi - largest airborne bird with a wingspan of over six meters; probably soared, but might not have been able to sustain flapping flight.

(via Fossils reveal largest airborne bird | Science News)

July82014
mothernaturenetwork:

How United is helping track tiny speciesThe airline teamed up with the Smithsonian to equip its planes with radio receiver antennas that will gather data on difficult-to-track animals.

mothernaturenetwork:

How United is helping track tiny species
The airline teamed up with the Smithsonian to equip its planes with radio receiver antennas that will gather data on difficult-to-track animals.

3PM
migeo:

Banded Iron Formations (by Ale*)
The Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) are a series of stratigraphic rock units deposited at different times in different environments. They contain higher-than-usual amounts of iron (Fe). These deposits are all Precambrian in age, and the ones in the image in particular are Archean (older than 2.5 billion years ago, that is 2,500,000,000 years). The current explanation for the abundance of Fe in these layers, albeit not totally accepted by the scientific community, is that Fe existed in solution in Archean ocean waters in its reduced form. Sudden increase in the amount of available oxygen, caused by the beginning of photosynthetic life in the form of stromatolite-building cyanobacteria, would have caused the reduced Fe to oxidize to hematite (and possibly magnetite). There is evidence in the fossil and rock records of an increase in atmospheric oxygen right after the last deposited BIFs. BIFs were never to form again. At the very beginning, before any BIFs were ever deposited, the most common form of Fe on Earth’s surface was pyrite. Pyrite today would not stand a chance of preservation in subaerial environment because of the abundance of oxygen in the atmosphere.
Soudan, Minnesota

migeo:

Banded Iron Formations (by Ale*)

The Banded Iron Formations (BIFs) are a series of stratigraphic rock units deposited at different times in different environments. They contain higher-than-usual amounts of iron (Fe). These deposits are all Precambrian in age, and the ones in the image in particular are Archean (older than 2.5 billion years ago, that is 2,500,000,000 years). The current explanation for the abundance of Fe in these layers, albeit not totally accepted by the scientific community, is that Fe existed in solution in Archean ocean waters in its reduced form. Sudden increase in the amount of available oxygen, caused by the beginning of photosynthetic life in the form of stromatolite-building cyanobacteria, would have caused the reduced Fe to oxidize to hematite (and possibly magnetite). There is evidence in the fossil and rock records of an increase in atmospheric oxygen right after the last deposited BIFs. BIFs were never to form again. At the very beginning, before any BIFs were ever deposited, the most common form of Fe on Earth’s surface was pyrite. Pyrite today would not stand a chance of preservation in subaerial environment because of the abundance of oxygen in the atmosphere.

Soudan, Minnesota

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