September52012
A lone rooster sees a lot of all the hens in the flock, but the hen with the largest comb gets a bigger dose of sperm — and thus more chicks. This sounds natural, but behind all this is humanity’s hunger for eggs.
In nature, the comb is an example of a sexual ornament. Individuals — often males — with the most impressive ornaments are favoured by females, thereby obtaining more numerous offspring than their competitors. In domesticated animals, sexual selection — like natural selection — has lost its role, as it was humans who determine breeding.
Source: For the rooster, size matters: How size of hen’s comb is linked to ability to lay more eggs

A lone rooster sees a lot of all the hens in the flock, but the hen with the largest comb gets a bigger dose of sperm — and thus more chicks. This sounds natural, but behind all this is humanity’s hunger for eggs.

In nature, the comb is an example of a sexual ornament. Individuals — often males — with the most impressive ornaments are favoured by females, thereby obtaining more numerous offspring than their competitors. In domesticated animals, sexual selection — like natural selection — has lost its role, as it was humans who determine breeding.

Source: For the rooster, size matters: How size of hen’s comb is linked to ability to lay more eggs

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