November182013

Arceuthobium americanum is a species of dwarf mistletoe known as American dwarf mistletoe and lodgepole-pine dwarf mistletoe. It is a common plant of western North America where it lives in high elevation pine forests. It is a parasitic plant which lives upon the Lodgepole Pine, particularly the subspecies Pinus contortus ssp. murrayana, the Tamarack Pine. This pine subspecies is most common in the Cascade Range and Sierra Nevada. The American dwarf mistletoe is a yellow-green coral-shaped structure above the surface of the tree’s bark, while most of the parasite is beneath the bark. The seeds mature in late summer and disperse to nearby trees.
The parasitic plant is dioecious, meaning that it has separate male and female parts. Studies of pine needles from infected trees have shown decreased starch content in the needles of infected trees. Furthermore, differences have been found in the positioning of the vascular bundles between female infected pine trees and male infected pine trees.

(via Arceuthobium americanum)
Cool!!!

Arceuthobium americanum is a species of dwarf mistletoe known as American dwarf mistletoe and lodgepole-pine dwarf mistletoe. It is a common plant of western North America where it lives in high elevation pine forests. It is a parasitic plant which lives upon the Lodgepole Pine, particularly the subspecies Pinus contortus ssp. murrayana, the Tamarack Pine. This pine subspecies is most common in the Cascade Range and Sierra Nevada. The American dwarf mistletoe is a yellow-green coral-shaped structure above the surface of the tree’s bark, while most of the parasite is beneath the bark. The seeds mature in late summer and disperse to nearby trees.

The parasitic plant is dioecious, meaning that it has separate male and female parts. Studies of pine needles from infected trees have shown decreased starch content in the needles of infected trees. Furthermore, differences have been found in the positioning of the vascular bundles between female infected pine trees and male infected pine trees.

(via Arceuthobium americanum)

Cool!!!

8PM

Drosera rotundifolia (the common sundew or round-leaved sundew) is a species of sundew, a carnivorous plant often found in bogs, marshes and fens. One of the most widespread sundew species, it is generally circumboreal, being found in all of northern Europe, much of Siberia, large parts of northern North America, Korea, Japan and is also found on New Guinea.

(Source: Drosera rotundifolia)

Drosera rotundifolia (the common sundew or round-leaved sundew) is a species of sundew, a carnivorous plant often found in bogs, marshes and fens. One of the most widespread sundew species, it is generally circumboreal, being found in all of northern Europe, much of Siberia, large parts of northern North America, Korea, Japan and is also found on New Guinea.

(Source: Drosera rotundifolia)

November102013

A team of scientists from the Institute of Cell Biophysics and the Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, has successfully revived a flowering plant from a 32,000-year-old fruit buried in Siberian permafrost.

[Souce: Russian Scientists Revive 32,000-Year-Old Flower]
^This article is from last year, but is news to me!  As an aside, this is an extant campion species. 

A team of scientists from the Institute of Cell Biophysics and the Institute of Physicochemical and Biological Problems in Soil Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, has successfully revived a flowering plant from a 32,000-year-old fruit buried in Siberian permafrost.

[Souce: Russian Scientists Revive 32,000-Year-Old Flower]

^This article is from last year, but is news to me!  As an aside, this is an extant campion species. 

July122013

just-breezy:

I saw some really cool aquatic plants the other day — this species is Common Bladderwort (Utricularia vulgaris).  

All Utricularia species are carnivorous and they capture prey in bladder-like traps.

In the active traps of the aquatic species, prey brush against trigger hairs connected to the trapdoor. The bladder, when “set”, is under negative pressure in relation to its environment so that when the trapdoor is mechanically triggered, the prey, along with the water surrounding it, is sucked into the bladder. Once the bladder is full of water, the door closes again, the whole process taking only ten to fifteen thousandths of a second.   The bladder traps, conversely, are recognized as one of the most sophisticated structures in the plant kingdom.  [via Wikipedia]

 

May112013

"According to Japan Times, a new species of carnivorous plant has been found in Aichi Prefecture, on the central-southern coast of Japan’s main island. The Japan Times calls it a "pitcher plant," which it is not; as a species related to (and mistaken for) Drosera indica, it’s actually a sundew.
Sundews and pitcher plants are both carnivorous, and largely insectivorous, but they’re very different otherwise. Pitcher plants have a large, cup-shaped flower with a slippery rim that unsuspecting prey falls into, where it is digested. Sundews, on the other hand, have tentacles, looking like very small spines topped with a clear drop of dew, hence the name. It isn’t dew, of course; it’s a sort of sticky mucous that traps insects, where they die of exhaustion, dehydration, starvation, or suffocation, to be digested by the enzymes within the mucous.”
Read more here

"According to Japan Times, a new species of carnivorous plant has been found in Aichi Prefecture, on the central-southern coast of Japan’s main island. The Japan Times calls it a "pitcher plant," which it is not; as a species related to (and mistaken for) Drosera indica, it’s actually a sundew.

Sundews and pitcher plants are both carnivorous, and largely insectivorous, but they’re very different otherwise. Pitcher plants have a large, cup-shaped flower with a slippery rim that unsuspecting prey falls into, where it is digested. Sundews, on the other hand, have tentacles, looking like very small spines topped with a clear drop of dew, hence the name. It isn’t dew, of course; it’s a sort of sticky mucous that traps insects, where they die of exhaustion, dehydration, starvation, or suffocation, to be digested by the enzymes within the mucous.”

Read more here

March162013

Six amazing orchids that look like animals:

  1. Monkey Face Orchid (Dracula simia) - These rare orchids only grow in the cloud forests of southeastern Ecuador and Peru at elevations of 1,000-2,000 meters on the side of mountains. Smells like a ripe orange.
  2. Bee Orchid (Ophrys apifera) - It resembles a female bumblebee visiting a pink flower to attract the attention of male bees.
  3. Pink Moth Orchid (Phalaenopsis sp.) - Looks like it has a little bird’s head guarding the flower nectar. 
  4. White Egret Orchid (Habenaria radiata) - The flower looks like the bird is spreading its fluffy white feathers, getting ready to take off.
  5. Holy Ghost Orchid(Peristeria elata) - has a beautiful dove shaped center.
  6. Flying Duck Orchid (Caleana major). It’s a small orchid, about 50 cm tall, that grows in eastern and southern Australia.

Source

^These are so cool!  Orchids are an amazing group of plants — they are often highly endemic and specialized; many have very specific mutualisms with insects and fungi.  Unfortunately, this high degree of specialization means they are vulnerable to extinction.

February42013
An epiphyte is a plant that grows upon another plant (such as a tree) non-parasitically or sometimes upon some other object (such as a building or a telegraph wire), derives its moisture and nutrients from the air and rain and sometimes from debris accumulating around it. Epiphytes are usually found in the temperate zone (e.g., many mosses, liverworts, lichens and algae) or in the tropics (e.g., many ferns, cacti, orchids, and bromeliads) 

An epiphyte is a plant that grows upon another plant (such as a tree) non-parasitically or sometimes upon some other object (such as a building or a telegraph wire), derives its moisture and nutrients from the air and rain and sometimes from debris accumulating around it. Epiphytes are usually found in the temperate zone (e.g., many mosses, liverworts, lichens and algae) or in the tropics (e.g., many ferns, cacti, orchids, and bromeliads) 

November282012
rhamphotheca:

curiousbotanicals: Pink Lithops, a succulent from arid southern Africa

Used to have one till I killed it.

rhamphotheca:

curiousbotanicals: Pink Lithops, a succulent from arid southern Africa

Used to have one till I killed it.

August172012
Hedgehog cacti - Echinocereus 

Hedgehog cacti - Echinocereus 

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org)

July302012
brilliantbotany:

Black isn’t a color you often find in the orchid family, Orchidaceae. It is therefore highly coveted. This is Cymbidium Kiwi Midnight, that being its commercial name. This flower is not actually true black, though it might appear to be, it is a deep burgundy.

brilliantbotany:

Black isn’t a color you often find in the orchid family, Orchidaceae. It is therefore highly coveted. This is Cymbidium Kiwi Midnight, that being its commercial name. This flower is not actually true black, though it might appear to be, it is a deep burgundy.

(Source: brilliantbotany)

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