January252014
Baron’s Mantella (Mantella baroni), Vohimana reserve, Madagascar 

(by Frank.Vassen)

Baron’s Mantella (Mantella baroni), Vohimana reserve, Madagascar

(by Frank.Vassen)

November162013

The Ecuador Poison Frog (Ameerega bilinguis) is a species of frog in the Dendrobatidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and possibly Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, rivers, intermittent rivers, freshwater marshes, and intermittent freshwater marshes. It is threatened by habitat loss. The flashy and brilliant colors of this species constitutes a warning for its potential predators that its skin produces poison, a feature that makes it an undesirable food source. It is very common to hear the male singing from slightly elevates areas in search of a female. After copulating they are the ones in charge of transporting the tadpoles on their backs towards ponds, where the tadpoles complete their development.

(via Ecuador poison frog)

The Ecuador Poison Frog (Ameerega bilinguis) is a species of frog in the Dendrobatidae family. It is found in Colombia, Ecuador, and possibly Peru. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, rivers, intermittent rivers, freshwater marshes, and intermittent freshwater marshes. It is threatened by habitat loss. The flashy and brilliant colors of this species constitutes a warning for its potential predators that its skin produces poison, a feature that makes it an undesirable food source. It is very common to hear the male singing from slightly elevates areas in search of a female. After copulating they are the ones in charge of transporting the tadpoles on their backs towards ponds, where the tadpoles complete their development.

(via Ecuador poison frog)

September82013
"The rogue chytrid fungus that has devastated more than 200 kinds of amphibians worldwide has an accomplice: a second species that researchers have discovered attacking fire salamanders.
Populations of frogs, salamanders and their relatives have been dwindling worldwide, and in 1999 scientists identified a surprising contributing factor – the fungus now nicknamed Bd. This Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis was the first member of the phylum of fungi called chytrids found to attack, and often kill, vertebrates. Now genetic tests have identified a second vertebrate-killing chytrid, the newly named Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans.
Researchers found the new fungus when volunteers reported a population crash in a yellow-and-black fire salamander, Salamandra salamandra, in the Netherlands. Numbers of salamanders fell to 4 percent of previous population levels in just three years. But genetic tests failed to find Bd, leading An Martel of Ghent University’s veterinary center in Merelbeke, Belgium and her colleagues to realize that they had found another chytrid.
Lab tests showed that fungus spores from a sick salamander caused the disease in another one, Martel and her colleagues report September 2 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
“It looks very cruel,” Martel says. Within days of infection, the fungus eats away the skin of a salamander until scientists need a microscope to see skin remnants. Martel can treat animals in captivity but what to do in the wild remains a puzzle. “You cannot treat an environment with an antifungal,” she says.”
[SOURCE: News in Brief: New fungus species found killing salamanders]

"The rogue chytrid fungus that has devastated more than 200 kinds of amphibians worldwide has an accomplice: a second species that researchers have discovered attacking fire salamanders.

Populations of frogs, salamanders and their relatives have been dwindling worldwide, and in 1999 scientists identified a surprising contributing factor – the fungus now nicknamed Bd. This Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis was the first member of the phylum of fungi called chytrids found to attack, and often kill, vertebrates. Now genetic tests have identified a second vertebrate-killing chytrid, the newly named Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans.

Researchers found the new fungus when volunteers reported a population crash in a yellow-and-black fire salamander, Salamandra salamandra, in the Netherlands. Numbers of salamanders fell to 4 percent of previous population levels in just three years. But genetic tests failed to find Bd, leading An Martel of Ghent University’s veterinary center in Merelbeke, Belgium and her colleagues to realize that they had found another chytrid.

Lab tests showed that fungus spores from a sick salamander caused the disease in another one, Martel and her colleagues report September 2 in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

“It looks very cruel,” Martel says. Within days of infection, the fungus eats away the skin of a salamander until scientists need a microscope to see skin remnants. Martel can treat animals in captivity but what to do in the wild remains a puzzle. “You cannot treat an environment with an antifungal,” she says.”

[SOURCE: News in Brief: New fungus species found killing salamanders]

August292013
August12013
"The Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) is a small chorus frog that is widespread throughout the eastern USA and Canada.  Spring Peepers are tan, brown, olive green, or gray.  Females are lighter-colored, while males are slightly smaller and usually have dark throats. This frog has a vocal sac located by its throat, which expands and deflates like a balloon to create a short and distinct peeping sound. Only males have the ability to make the high-pitched noise and they use it to attract mates.”
[SOURCE: Spring peeper]

"The Spring Peeper (Pseudacris crucifer) is a small chorus frog that is widespread throughout the eastern USA and Canada.  Spring Peepers are tan, brown, olive green, or gray.  Females are lighter-colored, while males are slightly smaller and usually have dark throats. This frog has a vocal sac located by its throat, which expands and deflates like a balloon to create a short and distinct peeping sound. Only males have the ability to make the high-pitched noise and they use it to attract mates.”

[SOURCE: Spring peeper]

July22013
American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)
(by Bill Bunn)

American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)

(by Bill Bunn)

February222013

Five species likely to become extinct in the next 40 years

  1. Rabb’s Fringe-Limbed Treefrog (Ecnomiohyla rabborum) - Estimated number in wild: One.  - The big-footed frogs have been devastated by a fungal disease that swept into the area in 2006. Scientists know of only one in the wild, identified by its call. Some live in captivity but have not bred.
  2. Ploughshare Tortoise (Astrochelys yniphora)Estimated number in the wild: 400 -Confined to five small, unconnected areas, the tortoises are “nearly certain to go extinct within the next 30 years,” according to the Wildlife Conservation Society. A fragmented habitat limits breeding, and poachers take them for the illegal pet trade.
  3. Hirola (Damaliscus hunteri)Estimated number in wild: 600 - The population has steadily declined because of disease, drought and predators. Cattle farmers have taken over much of the antelope’s habitat, and poaching continues in both countries.
  4. Baiji (Lipotes vexillifer) Estimated number in wild: Unknown. - Scientists declared the dolphin extinct in 2006 after a survey of the Yangtze River failed to yield a single one, but there has since been an unconfirmed sighting. Dams and water pollution have eliminated or damaged the animal’s habitat.
  5. The Cat Ba Langur (Trachypithecus poliocephalus) - Estimated number in wild: 59 - They are hunted for “monkey balm,” a traditional medicine. Most surviving langurs are females in isolated groups with little access to males.

(Source: smithsonianmag.com)

February172013
Agalychnis callidryas, the red-eyed tree frog, is a slender, colorful, medium-sized frog. Females measure up to 77 mm, and males to 59 mm (Savage 2002). This frog has leaf-green to dark green dorsal surfaces; dark blue, purple, or brownish flanks, with cream-colored or yellow vertical or diagonal bars; blue or orange upper arms; thighs that are blue or orange on the anterior, posterior, and ventral surfaces; orange hands and feet, except for the outermost digits on each; a white ventrum; and protuberant red eyes, with vertical pupils (Savage 2002; Leenders 2001; Duellman 2001).
Read full article: Red-eyed Leaf Frog (Agalychnis callidryas)

Agalychnis callidryas, the red-eyed tree frog, is a slender, colorful, medium-sized frog. Females measure up to 77 mm, and males to 59 mm (Savage 2002). This frog has leaf-green to dark green dorsal surfaces; dark blue, purple, or brownish flanks, with cream-colored or yellow vertical or diagonal bars; blue or orange upper arms; thighs that are blue or orange on the anterior, posterior, and ventral surfaces; orange hands and feet, except for the outermost digits on each; a white ventrum; and protuberant red eyes, with vertical pupils (Savage 2002; Leenders 2001; Duellman 2001).

Read full article: Red-eyed Leaf Frog (Agalychnis callidryas)

July312012

When researchers surveyed this creature’s habitat in 2007, only 6-8 individual Blue-eyed Bush Frogs (Philautus neelanethrus) were found in the Myristica swamps. You might think this is a low number, but apparently this was the highest density the team found. Other areas only revealed 2-4 individuals in forested habitats.

Source: Check Out This Frog’s Eyes: Blue-eyed Bush Frog

July192012
ScienceDaily (July 18, 2012) — Climate change, habitat destruction, pollution and invasive species are all involved in the global crisis of amphibian declines and extinctions, researchers suggest in a new analysis, but increasingly these forces are causing actual mortality in the form of infectious disease.
Read Article @ Environmental concerns increasing infectious disease in amphibians, other animals

ScienceDaily (July 18, 2012) — Climate change, habitat destruction, pollution and invasive species are all involved in the global crisis of amphibian declines and extinctions, researchers suggest in a new analysis, but increasingly these forces are causing actual mortality in the form of infectious disease.

Read Article @ Environmental concerns increasing infectious disease in amphibians, other animals

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