January252014
Baron’s Mantella (Mantella baroni), Vohimana reserve, Madagascar 

(by Frank.Vassen)

Baron’s Mantella (Mantella baroni), Vohimana reserve, Madagascar

(by Frank.Vassen)

August92013
July22013
American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)
(by Bill Bunn)

American Bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana)

(by Bill Bunn)

October212012

rhamphotheca:

The Deadly Thumbs of Japanese Flick Knife Frogs Posted

by Amy Briggs

The Japanese Otton frog (Babina subaspera) may look harmless, but don’t be fooled by its ordinary green, warty appearance. This frog carries concealed weapons.

A new study has discovered that the Otton frog has sharp retractable claws that shoot out of its thumbs. The rare frog, native to the Amani islands of Southern Japan, uses these “switchblades” to fight and to mate. Conducted by Dr. Noriko Iwai from the University of Tokyo, the new study is published in the Journal of Zoology.

Since 2004, Dr. Iwai has been studying rare frogs to understand the species’ distribution, breeding habits, and range in order to craft sound conservation strategies. Frogs with five digits on their front limbs are uncommon (most have four); the Otton frog’s shares this rare trait with the five-fingered Hypsiboas rosenbergi frogs of Latin America.

“Why these ‘fifth fingers’ exist in some species remains an evolutionary mystery, but the extra digit of the Otton is in fact a pseudo-thumb,” said Dr. Iwai. “The digit encases a sharp spine which can project out of the skin, which fieldwork demonstrates is used for combat and mating.”…

(read more: National Geo)         (photos: N. Iwai)

August62012
pinealgland:

The see-through skin of an 2.5-centimeter-long glass frog reveals her eggs. Native to Venezuela, the frogs lay eggs in bushes and trees overhanging streams. Tadpoles hatch, then tumble into the current to be swept away.

pinealgland:

The see-through skin of an 2.5-centimeter-long glass frog reveals her eggs. Native to Venezuela, the frogs lay eggs in bushes and trees overhanging streams. Tadpoles hatch, then tumble into the current to be swept away.

(via shedsumlight)

July262012

just-breezy:

Found this little frog in my flowers today! 

July192012
ScienceDaily (July 18, 2012) — Climate change, habitat destruction, pollution and invasive species are all involved in the global crisis of amphibian declines and extinctions, researchers suggest in a new analysis, but increasingly these forces are causing actual mortality in the form of infectious disease.
Read Article @ Environmental concerns increasing infectious disease in amphibians, other animals

ScienceDaily (July 18, 2012) — Climate change, habitat destruction, pollution and invasive species are all involved in the global crisis of amphibian declines and extinctions, researchers suggest in a new analysis, but increasingly these forces are causing actual mortality in the form of infectious disease.

Read Article @ Environmental concerns increasing infectious disease in amphibians, other animals

July142012

I’m warning you right now: this is a seriously cool amphibian. It’s called the Marbled Tree Frog (Dendropsophus marmoratus) and it’s pretty hard to pick a side to check out first. I mean, its belly is absolutely wild looking with a cheetah-ish print whereas its top is the side really living up to its name. Look how well its marbled back blends in with its surroundings!

Source:  There Are Two (wild) Sides to Every Frog

July102012

Twinkling in the dimmest of places within the tropical jungles of South America is the Fringe-limbed Tree Frog (Cochranella euknemos)Its name euknemos derives from Greek and means “with beautiful legs,” which refers to the frog’s fringed hind limbs.  

Even cooler, this is a species of glass frog, so you can look through and see its organs!

(Source: thefeaturedcreature.com)

June282012
This purple and gold frog was recently discovered in a remote mountainous region of Colombia. It’s called the Golden Poison Frog of Supatá (Ranitomeya sp.) and it sure is a pretty little thing. 

This purple and gold frog was recently discovered in a remote mountainous region of Colombia. It’s called the Golden Poison Frog of Supatá (Ranitomeya sp.) and it sure is a pretty little thing. 

(Source: thefeaturedcreature.com)

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