October262013
California Chipmonk (via San Diego Natural History Museum)

California Chipmonk (via San Diego Natural History Museum)

August182013
Shrouded in the mist of an Andean cloud forest, the first newly discovered carnivore in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years rarely leaves its treetop home.
Smithsonian researchers stumbled upon Bassaricyon neblina, also known as the “olinguito,” while riffling through museum specimens and old field notes in search of information about other members of the Bassaricyon genus—commonly known as olingos.
Described August 15 in ZooKeys, the olinguito weighs just 2 pounds and resides at 5,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level, making the orange-and-brown tree dweller the smallest and highest-venturing of the olingo species.
Misidentified until now, olinguito specimens have existed in museums for 100 years, and at least one olinguito lived in several U.S. zoos during the 1960s and 1970s.
[SOURCE: News in Brief: New carnivore species found]

Shrouded in the mist of an Andean cloud forest, the first newly discovered carnivore in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years rarely leaves its treetop home.

Smithsonian researchers stumbled upon Bassaricyon neblina, also known as the “olinguito,” while riffling through museum specimens and old field notes in search of information about other members of the Bassaricyon genus—commonly known as olingos.

Described August 15 in ZooKeys, the olinguito weighs just 2 pounds and resides at 5,000 to 9,000 feet above sea level, making the orange-and-brown tree dweller the smallest and highest-venturing of the olingo species.

Misidentified until now, olinguito specimens have existed in museums for 100 years, and at least one olinguito lived in several U.S. zoos during the 1960s and 1970s.

[SOURCE: News in Brief: New carnivore species found]

July52013
Climbing Bighorn Sheep

(by Charles Peterson)

Climbing Bighorn Sheep

(by Charles Peterson)

June252013
rhamphotheca:

Red Squirrel Adoption
Not all baby animals left alone are abandoned. Squirrels, like this American Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) will actually adopt abandoned baby squirrels if they notice a relative has not come back for them. 
(via: USFWS_Pacific Region)

rhamphotheca:

Red Squirrel Adoption

Not all baby animals left alone are abandoned. Squirrels, like this American Red Squirrel (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) will actually adopt abandoned baby squirrels if they notice a relative has not come back for them.

(via: USFWS_Pacific Region)

March82013
American Marten by Len Modderman

American Marten by Len Modderman

February22013
January22013
November122012
The Brazilian three-banded armadillo, Tolypeutes tricinctus, will be the mascot of the 2014 FIFA World Cup which will take place in Brazil. The species was believed to be extinct until it was rediscovered in 1988 in a handful of locations.  Photo: Joel Sartore

The Brazilian three-banded armadillo, Tolypeutes tricinctus, will be the mascot of the 2014 FIFA World Cup which will take place in Brazil. The species was believed to be extinct until it was rediscovered in 1988 in a handful of locations.  Photo: Joel Sartore

October212012
rhamphotheca:

Aegyptopithecus - 30 million years ago
Aegyptopithecus — the name honors Egypt, where its fossil remains were found — was a primitive anthropoid, the group that includes monkeys, apes, and us. It would have weighed about 15 pounds, roughly the same as a modern howler monkey, and its behavior would have been similar to that of living monkeys.
(via: Nova scienceNOW)

rhamphotheca:

Aegyptopithecus - 30 million years ago

Aegyptopithecus — the name honors Egypt, where its fossil remains were found — was a primitive anthropoid, the group that includes monkeys, apes, and us. It would have weighed about 15 pounds, roughly the same as a modern howler monkey, and its behavior would have been similar to that of living monkeys.

(via: Nova scienceNOW)

September302012

rhamphotheca:

twothunderbirds:vanished:  Paul Nicklen - White Black Bear

Have you ever seen a black bear that was actually white? Known as the spirit bear or the Kermode bear, this revered and rare creature is found almost exclusively in the a moss-draped rainforest in British Columbia, Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest.

For National Geographic’s August issue, photographer Paul Nicklen captured the spirit bear in all its glory. With a population of only about 400 to 1,000, the white bear is a rare sight to behold.

Just how do they get that color? “Scientists know how black bears are born white. They’re just not sure why,” says Bruce Barcott of National Geographic. “The phenomenon, known as Kermodism, is triggered by a recessive mutation at the MC1R gene, the same gene associated with red hair and fair skin in humans. To be born white, a bear must inherit the mutation from both parents. The parents themselves don’t have to be white. They just need to carry the recessive mutation. So it’s not uncommon for white bears to be born to black parents.”

(via wildmammals)

← Older entries Page 1 of 3